Condoms & Contraceptives

Contraceptives, commonly known as birth control, are designed to prevent pregnancy. Contraceptive methods work in several different ways and have different levels of effectiveness. Barrier methods are one form of contraceptives and work by physically stopping sperm from getting to the egg during sex. Condoms are the only barrier method that help prevent STDs when used consistently and correctly.

Females may be interested in using other methods of contraception like the pill, the ring, the patch, the shot, the implant, or IUDs to reduce their risk of pregnancy. It is important to also use a condom since these methods do not protect against STDs. These methods of contraception must be prescribed by a medical provider, while condoms can be purchased in most drug stores and found for free in many clinics.

Minor's Rights

In Florida, minors have the right to access contraceptive services without parental consent if:

  • The minor is married

  • The minor is a parent

  • The minor is pregnant

  • If in the opinion of the physician, the minor would suffer probable health hazards if such services are not provided

However, it is still a good idea to talk to your parent or trusted adult about getting contraceptives.

Need Help?

Visit Teen Connect Tampa Bay to find local health care providers:

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